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Desktop Tables / Re: Teacher's Pet - Williams 1965
« Last post by pinella on Today at 11:23:39 AM »
Great Table thanks for making it
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General Discussion / Re: Credit Requirement for Downloading Tables
« Last post by pinella on Today at 10:02:15 AM »
Sounds like an interesting system, I'll say hi and have an explore :)
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Pinball Discussion / Bingo Pinball
« Last post by Piffer on June 11, 2019, 10:04:06 AM »
A tip for anyone who loves Bingo-Pinballs: https://www.bingo.joopriem.nl/ A realy fantastic program for desktop and cabinet. Enjoy ist!
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Full Screen Tables / Re: Dragonette (Gottlieb 1954)
« Last post by Snarfer on June 09, 2019, 10:21:23 AM »
I love these old tables.   Really appreciate the effort put in to recreate these valuable historical games.  Can't wait to try it out, it looks great.
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Desktop Tables / Re: Teacher's Pet - Williams 1965
« Last post by Ttrenkner on May 24, 2019, 02:22:37 PM »
Thank you for yet another great addition to your EM collection!
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Desktop Tables / Re: Rockettes - Gottlieb 1950
« Last post by Pinball_Wolvi on May 20, 2019, 01:36:59 PM »
Many thanks for the 3 new Tables!
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Desktop Tables / Rockettes - Gottlieb 1950
« Last post by pbecker1946 on May 20, 2019, 12:04:57 AM »
Rockettes - Gottlieb 1950




http://roguepinball.com/index.php?action=downloads;sa=view;down=590Gottlieb's Rockettes, designed by Harry Mabs with art by Roy Parker, was released in August 1950.  1,000 units were produced so this game is rare today. Harry Mabs designed the flipper in 1947, and remained an innovator for his entire career.  Recreating several of his machines has given me an appreciation for Harry's design work that I didn't have before.  He quietly invented many things we take for granted today. In Rockettes we see one of Harry's inventions in the form of the bi-directional kicker hole.  It is an appropriate tribute to the stereotypical Rockettes dance line as the dancers kick in unison with one leg, then the other. Making high score takes getting the "line" to kick UP, then getting the ball in the bottom hole while it is lit.
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Desktop Tables / Sweet Hearts - Gottlieb 1963
« Last post by pbecker1946 on May 20, 2019, 12:03:09 AM »
Sweet Hearts - Gottlieb 1963




http://roguepinball.com/index.php?action=downloads;sa=view;down=589Gottlieb's Sweet Hearts, designed by Wayne Neyens with art by Roy Parker was released in September 1963.  4,450 units were produced. Sweet Hearts is the last Gottlieb flipper game to have a gobble hole, so in my effort to recreate "firsts" and "lasts" it made the list. It turns out to be a very playable example of the gobble hole era. It is also the first Gottlieb game to display the ZIP code (new in 1963) on its logo.  Until you figure out the strategy to beat this game, it can seem like a drain monster, but with the right approach it is a fun game and quite beatable. If you make all of the cards, then every rollover will be special. It is almost (but not quite) impossible to do.
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Desktop Tables / Teacher's Pet - Williams 1965
« Last post by pbecker1946 on May 20, 2019, 12:00:44 AM »
Teacher's Pet - Williams 1965




http://roguepinball.com/index.php?action=downloads;sa=view;down=588Teacher's Pet was released in December 1965 and was designed by Steve Kordek. I can't find who did the artwork for Teachers Pet. 1,600 Teacher's Pet games were produced. Teacher's Pet is a good example of how the EM games of the early 1960s had advanced in design.  As you make the letters in Teacher's Pet the value of the drop targets increases, ultimately reaching special if you make all of the letters.  The combination of kickers, targets, and rollovers to make the letters adds interest.  The drop targets drop when hit and can't be hit again until one of the three rollover buttons is hit which raises them back up. If you make the 1-2-3 sequence the lower Free Ball Gate opens until it is hit.
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Pinball Discussion / Re: Computer Crash/Lost Pinballs
« Last post by pourquoi4 on May 19, 2019, 09:30:13 PM »
Thanks, I will look at Itchys Cab, but I was offering to convert tables to Fullscreen from Desktop, meaning those tables not already converted.

Also, many converted tables are off in scale, so they don't play quite right. I adjust them to play as much like the real tables as possible (I attend as many pinball expo's as possible to play real tables)
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